MARK Issue 55


April 2015 Surprise Unwrapped!

MARK magazine is amongst the three successful publications produced by Frame Publishers based in The Netherlands and targeted at a global creative audience. The other two publications are Frame, on interior design and Elephant on art and visual culture. Launched in 2005, Mark has an un-academic approach to the subject of architecture and therefore makes itself a great read to even those lacking a technical background but harboring a fondness for this field of design. Mark is published quarterly.

ISSUE 55

Mark #55 goes off the radar - while touring villages for sale in Europe you are introduced to a digital-detox hotel in Italy, sardine exporting fishing town in Spain and other prehistoric villages, which have been given the luxury treatment. Exploring the necessity of bad architecture, from a comic-book explosion in a quiet suburb, to a human cargo case for an airplane – where functionality mingles inextricably with aesthetic statements to disrupt symbolic power constructs, #55 treads interesting paths.

Did the extra-dimensional architectural construct or ‘hypercube’ in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, boggle your mind? The cross-section takes a look at several sources of inspiration in putting together this tesseract, where time becomes physical, a collaboration between designers Nathan Crowly and Paul Franklin, which took nearly a year.

TEAM


  • Robert Thiemann: editor-in-chief
    David Keuning: Editor
    Edwin van Gelder, Mainstudio: Art Director

OUR PICK

If you are not an architect, understandably floor plans are unlikely to excite you but then if you are amongst those who find themselves stopping by a beautiful or even a curious structure, critiquing its appearance or simply wondering at the beauty of it all, then you will have ample opportunity to explore your interest in this area of design with MARK, as it travels around the world in search of marvelous (sometime bizarre!) dwellings.

Villages for sale in Southern Europe, which are getting converted into luxury retreats and the feature on David Benjamin channeling biotechnology in luminous, ephemeral public installations, make for engaging reads.

But we particularly enjoyed the interview with Dider Fautino, trained to be a plumber who stumbled upon architecture by chance and today is one of the savants of the field; and also the chat with Kjetil Trædal Thorsen of Oslo firm Snøhetta where he discusses his preference for fictional over professional literature.

In The Press

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