Peeps #02


November 2016 Surprise Unwrapped!

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Peeps #02
Website: http://peepsforum.com/magazine

A small format magazine tackling expansive areas of the world, Toronto based PEEPS is a publication committed to research and storytelling on culture and context. Largely contributed by anthropologists, ethnographers and other field experts whose life work revolves around people, Peeps puts analysis at a pedestal.

ISSUE 02

Staying true to their tagline ‘Tracking cultural shifts around the world’, Peeps #02 puts together an impressive range of stories including long features, articles on social research, short insights on cultural trends, photo-stories and analytical essays. Interspersed in between, are vignettes that add to the human element. The shared theme in all the stories is that of thresholds and the interaction between the individual with other individuals and the weaving of a society.

TEAM


  • Publisher, Creative Director| Greg Salmela
    Editor| Aliah El-houni
    Editor| Anya-Milana Sulaver
    Designer| Sabrina Xiang
    Communications| Ixchel Aleph Cervantes

OUR PICK

‘Not Wanted on the Rue Saint-Denis’ by MATHILDE CARO and translated by ALEXIA PAPADOPOULOS is an engaging feature on the prostitutes of Rue Saint-Denis and the shaping of their lives due to the gentrification of the city. An eye-opening piece, Caro explores aspects such as demographics, racism, and uses her sharp skills as a doctoral student to construct a vivid picture that is impossible to forget too easily. Watch out for the raw emotive photographs by BORIS SVARTZMAN accompanying the piece!

‘The Rights of the Whanganui River’ by ANNE SALMOND is a riveting account of the only water body that has been granted a legal right to be a living person. The narrative swings from the experiences of the crew that started out to make a documentary on the writer’s great-grandfather and goes on to explore the Whanganui River, it’s role as a literal lifeline to the natives and the implications of human control over untouched natural resources.

BARBARA HEER pens a powerful expose on post-apartheid Johannesburg, a city that attracts harsh criticism from the outside world for the lack of basic amenities but a city that is home to its people and most importantly, their freedom.

In The Press

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